The complexity of my training program is just incredible

What I am doing is a 3 day cycle of training…two essentially full body days and then a conditioning day….it looks like this:
Day 1 – Squats and Pull Ups
Warm Up
Hip Mobility/Stability Work
Squat Variation – This is always back squatting at the moment…I’ve been playing around with the rep and set ranges…not really trying to push massive numbers…just doing enough to know that I’ve done the damage I am looking for then moving on…6-8 sets of 5-8 reps.
Supplementary Hamstring – Have been rotating through ham/glute raises, rdl’s, single leg deadlifts and leg curls…3-5 sets of 8-12 reps.
Core Work 1 – I will come back to this at the end and explain what I’ve been doing here.
Shoulder Mobility/Stability Work
Pull Ups – Same as with the squats…some lower rep weighted pull ups and higher rep regular pull ups…6-8 sets of 5-8 reps.
Rowing Variation – Chest Supported Rows or Dumbbell Rows for 5 sets of 10 reps.
Push Ups – 5 sets of 10 reps.
Core Work 2
Tricep Variation – I basically do this in 3 different lines of pull….straight down, straight out in front or straight up and just cycle through those 3 lines of pull…3-5 sets of 8-12 reps.
Core Work 3

Day 2 – Deadlift and Bench
Deadlift Variation – This is either straight bar or trap bar at the moment…I’ve been alternating between the two so as to nurse my back a little as I get back into shape…not really trying to push massive numbers here either…6-8 sets of 5-8 reps.
Supplementary Quadriceps – Have been rotating through leg extensions, lunge variations and elevated spilt squats…3-5 sets of 8-12 reps.
Core Work 1
Shoulder Mobility/Stability Work
Bench Press – This is pretty straight forward…6-8 sets of 5-8 reps…just want to get this back to 1.5xBW.
Fly Variation – Either Dumbbell or a Cable Fly variation for 5 sets of 10 reps.
Inverted Rows – 5 sets of 10 reps.
Core Work 2
Bicep Variation – Just cycling through whatever I feel like here as well…3-5 sets of 8-12 reps.
Core Work 3

Day 3 – Conditioning Circuit
You’ve seen plenty of this on the blog previously. I just put this together on the day…the template is always the same.

Cardio Block 1 – 10-15 minutes hard cardio on the bike, treadmill or rower.
Work Block 1 – 15 minutes…a leg exercise…this could be anything from trap bar deadlifts, step ups, box jumps or kettlebell squats, a pressing exercise…like push press, kettlebell or dumbbell shoulder presses, military presses and a rowing exercise…inverted rows, kettlebell or dumbbell rows…it doesn’t matter. Depending on the loading we do 5-10 reps….actually it is usually either 5 or 10 reps. We do these three exercise variations as a circuit and get as many done as we can in 15 minutes. So it might be 5 box jumps, 5 kettlebell rows each arm and 5 kettlebell presses each arm.
Cardio Block 2 – 10-15 mins….as with Cardio Block 1
Work Block 2 – 15 minutes…same as the first block only it is legs, a pressing exercise…like barbell or dumbeel bench, floor pressing, push ups, blast strap push ups etc and a vertical pulling exercise like pull ups, chin ups or lat pulldowns.
Cardio Block 3 – 10-15 mins….as with Cardio Block 1 and 2.

After I cool down a little I do some supplementary back work….5 sets of 12 reps of Back Extensions and Natural Reverse Hypers as a superset.

Core Work
This is something I get a lot of questions about what I do is pretty simple…for me core work is either static or dynamic and liner or rotational….so I tend to cycle through all those things…let me give you some easy examples:

Day 1:
Core Work 1 – Side Bridging – 3 sets of 45 sec/45 sec
Core Work 2 – Ab Pulldowns – 5 sets of 10 reps
Core Work 3 – Hi Lo Woodchoppers – 5 sets of 10 reps

Day 2:
Core Work 1 – Straight Bridging – 5 sets of 60 sec/60 sec
Core Work 2 – Hanging Leg Raises – 5 sets of 10 reps
Core Work 3 – Torque Press or Torque Hold – 3 sets or whatever.

Summary
So that is my 3 day cycle…I do 3 days…take a rest day or have a day with some light cardio and some stretching then do the same cycle all over again. It seems to be working out just fine…have lost a sizeable amount of flab and am feeling better strength wise every week. We’ll see how it works out for me come the 1st of July when I retest. I have also been doing a good bit of easy cardio….30-50 mins prior to and after my strength sessions….mainly because I can…this is in the 115-130bpm range only.

Advertisements

22 thoughts on “The complexity of my training program is just incredible

    • This is a post in of itself. I think one of the reasons for this other than training history and training age is technique. I don’t just mean the way an exercise looks to an observer but how it actually feels when I do it. I am always really focused on making sure I get the ‘feel’ I’m after when I exercise. I don’t think enough people do this…they do the exercise…and they do it right…as in there is nothing wrong with it to the eye….but I don’t think enough trainees really get their heads in to what they are doing. June is going to be a massive month for me. I am really just now feeling ‘fit to train’ in that my work capacity has improved to the extent that my session quality and intensity are going to make some big jumps this month.

  1. Tell the truth Will. You’re just trying to get back in shape to take on some of the MMA guys, arent you? Only kidding, its great to see you working hard on yourself, looking forward to taining with you in the new gym.

    Tom

    • Tom D said
      Tell the truth Will.
      Are you saying that because you think I never do?
      You’re just trying to get back in shape to take on some of the MMA guys, arent you?
      Yes, I would love to fight in some way shape or form this year.
      Only kidding, its great to see you working hard on yourself, looking forward to taining with you in the new gym.
      Me too. I’m really looking forward to it. See you there very soon.

  2. How long are you generally looking at per session?

    From what I gather conditioning days are around 90 minutes + supplementary back work,
    strength days look like anywhere from 75-90 minutes, with cardio either side totalling an hour this takes it out to well over 2 hours?

    • Tim said
      How long are you generally looking at per session?

      From what I gather conditioning days are around 90 minutes + supplementary back work,
      Yes.
      strength days look like anywhere from 75-90 minutes, with cardio either side totalling an hour this takes it out to well over 2 hours?
      …and Yes.

  3. Woohoo, love these posts 🙂

    I don’t want to confuse you by making several posts under different blog entries on the same day within the same minute…, you probably already have your hands full decrypting your own training/diet, so I am going to try and cluster my rambling. Nor do I want to steal your show… but your training and diet looks surprisingly a lot like mine 😉

    I started at 78kg 1.5month ago, today I was 70.8kg, I share your pain and joy, even though we are no friends 🙂

    Are you still doing any MMA/MT sessions?

    So last week I did a conditioning session a la Will Heffernan and I really enjoyed the template. The cardio blocks consisted of 4m-1m row x3, which almost killed me (max 856m).
    Which brings me to my next question;
    your conditioning session template always looks the same, is there any reason why you never change the length (time) of the different blocks? i.e. make the cardio blocks longer and the strength blocks shorter depending on the needs of the athlete?

    I have a lot more questions about conditioning, but at the moment I dont have a clue how to put them into words…. time will cure this problem…

    thnx
    Angelo

    • Angelo Pollice said
      Woohoo, love these posts
      Good…because basically I still have no real idea what people want to see here so that’s a good bit of information.

      I don’t want to confuse you by making several posts under different blog entries on the same day within the same minute…,
      That doesn’t sound like you….go on…give in to your urges.

      you probably already have your hands full decrypting your own training/diet, so I am going to try and cluster my rambling. Nor do I want to steal your show… but your training and diet looks surprisingly a lot like mine
      I’m sure it is very much like a lot of peoples…like I’ve said before getting fit and lean isn’t really rocket surgery.

      I started at 78kg 1.5month ago, today I was 70.8kg, I share your pain and joy, even though we are no friends
      That’s because you are a skinny little wretch.

      Are you still doing any MMA/MT sessions?
      No, but like a lot of people…mainly because I’ve been holding back till we move into the new facility.

      So last week I did a conditioning session a la Will Heffernan and I really enjoyed the template. The cardio blocks consisted of 4m-1m row x3, which almost killed me (max 856m).
      What the hell is ‘4m-1m row x3’
      Which brings me to my next question;
      your conditioning session template always looks the same, is there any reason why you never change the length (time) of the different blocks? i.e. make the cardio blocks longer and the strength blocks shorter depending on the needs of the athlete?
      You haven’t seen enough examples then because it is always very different although the template is the same. Yes, the strength blocks are always 10-15 minutes BUT the exercises change and the loading differs a lot…for either low or high reps from 2-10 reps. The cardio blocks differ even more…from short intervals, to long intervals, to steady state work or full on anaerobic threshold work and this is done on the bike, treadmill or rower or combinations of the three. So if by they’re always the same you actually mean they are all incredibly different…then yes, they’re always the same.

      • What the hell is ‘4m-1m row x3′
        4 minutes of rowing followed by 1 minute of rest followed by 4 minutes of rowing followed by 1 minute of rest followed by 4 minutes of rowing, and you were saying it wasn’t rocket surgery 🙂

        You haven’t seen enough examples then because it is always very different although the template is the same. Yes, the strength blocks are always 10-15 minutes BUT the exercises change and the loading differs a lot…for either low or high reps from 2-10 reps. The cardio blocks differ even more…from short intervals, to long intervals, to steady state work or full on anaerobic threshold work and this is done on the bike, treadmill or rower or combinations of the three. So if by they’re always the same you actually mean they are all incredibly different…then yes, they’re always the same.
        that is what I meant, thnx for the explaining, I understand it a bit more now 🙂

        Angelo

  4. What do you think of adding this cycling on top of sessions for rowers, runners etc for more aerobic volume (and consequently training load) with less chance of overuse injuries (both) or muscle damage due to eccentric (running mainly) alowing easier recovery?

    I personally find a 30 minute ride much easier to recover from than 30 minute run, the relative training volumes of runners and cyclists and the relative volume of running and cycling done by triathletes would seem to support this. Obviously it would be best just to maximise volume but for all sportspeople/athletes bar true long distance athletes volume is often secondary to intensity and even for distance athletes intensity is still an important parameter.

    I know rowers in particular are big on the cross training on the bike (it is probably a more similar movement vs running and cycling) though obviously there are a lot of peripheral adaptations specific to each sport. Is it worth going after the central adaptation from cycling for those who don’t own one of these http://www.alter-g.com/alterg/a.aspx?

    • Tim said
      What do you think of adding this cycling on top of sessions for rowers, runners etc for more aerobic volume (and consequently training load) with less chance of overuse injuries (both) or muscle damage due to eccentric (running mainly) alowing easier recovery?
      Mate I’m not sure whether you realise this but a lot of people in the fitness and strength and conditioning industry are totally full of shit?

      So many people crapping on about interval training and sprints for fat loss and running out bullshit like ‘look at 100m runners…they are all ripped and all they do is sprints’….let me in on a little secret….they are all of west African descent and all pretty much use gear as well.

      Yes, intervals and sprints work….but to tell people with little or no training base or experience to do them for fat loss is fucking idiotic.

      STEADY STATE cardio works…just ask any ultra marathon runner….do enough and the fat goes…along with everything else. Doing a little absolutely helps….at the start of my program I was doing 20 mins before and after weights sessions, by week 2 I was doing 30 mins. Now I’m doing 30 mins before and 60 after without a bother. It has virtually no impact at all on my training and if anything I think it helps my recovery rather than hinder it.

      I could not run 30 mins before and 60 mins after obviously…I could walk it I suppose…it is just easier to hurl abuse and ridicule people from the bike.

      The rest of your questions are interesting and I will deal with them when I get back from work tonight. I have to go do some work.

      • Hi Will, I’m well aware of (and in agreeance with) this, I’m not really talking about steady state vs intervals vs sprints or anything like that, or really about fat loss either. I’m more talking about adding extra volume to aerobic work through using cycling, especially with sports were volume is limited due to overuse concerns etc. I think some examples might demonstrate my point better:

        Runner (say middle distance) does 60 min (submaximal/steady state/general aerobic/whatever) run, if he adds 30 min bike afterwards can he get benefits (mainly central mechanisms as suggested in other questions) due to increased volume and increase the training effect (obviously assuming 60 min is at same intensity either way)?

        Athlete does standard interval session (Warm Up, Intervals, Cool Down), if he adds 30 min on bike afterwards as extended cooldown could this add to overall weekly volume and possibly give recovery benefit as well?

        Athlete adds 30 min bike here are there in program as additional sessions, will this help the training load as much as it will hinder recovery?

        The above could be applied to many field sports as well I’m sure.

        Really what I see with stationary cycling is a form of exercise with:

        1) Low technical demand, efficiency not a concern, minimal learning curve (most say cycling efficiency is not trainable).

        2) Low postural demand, easy to adjust/monitor/modify things during the session.

        3) Constant, easily modified range of motion.

        4) Load/intensity easily set and monitored. Can easily set intensity to get deesired heart rate response as due to points 1-3, heart rate response to intensity is very predictable.

        5) No eccentric phase, so much less muscle damage and therefore less likely to negatively effect other, higher priority training sessions.

        I think these make cycling a very attractive option for “cross-training” or in training programs with complex or varied goals. What it really comes down to is how to fit it best in the context of the overall program to get:

        1) Maximum improvement from the “cross-training”, or the best dose-response.

        2) Minimum interference and maximum assistance (i.e. increased recovery) with the rest of the program.

        Hopefully this clarifies things.

  5. Tim,

    I’m not Will but since he’ll probably read your post drunk and make a bunch more irrelevant comments, I’d say that the answer to your question is a resounding yes. Assuming that an athlete is looking to just increase general training volume (and get some general/central cardio adaptations) while sparing their body some pounding, cycling makes sense.

    Not that an excess can’t cause some imbalances as well (tight hip flexors for example) but as a low technical way of getting some volume in while sparing the joints, I think it’s a good way to go.

    And I think you’ll see that approach in a lot of even pure endurance sports (I know rowers use bikes and cross country skiing to get general aerobic adaptations). I do think you have to adjust volume a bit to get the same level of adaptation.

    My rule of thumb is that cycling volume is ~2-3Xrunning volume which I think is consistent with general theory (e.g. a max long run for a runner might be 2-3 hours, cyclists might go 4-6) so 60 minutes cycling ~= 20-30 minutes running in terms of adaptations or at least in that shooting distance.

    In fact, I think you’ll find that Will does that very thing with a lot of his rugby type athletes. They get pounded on enough on the pitch and in practice, adding more running or high impact stuff is overkill. So I know he uses a lot of bike/rower for general conditioning to spare their joints.

    Lyle

  6. I won’t bother going over this because I think both you and Lyle covered it…Lyle and I have discussed this previously. I am a big fan of ‘accruing volume’…it works.

  7. Thanks Lyle, definitely makes sense, especially the weight-bearing consideration for heavier athletes.

    I wouldn’t mind discussing methods of “accruing volume” more specifically. Basically my thoughts and questions at the moment relate primarily to running so this is the example I’ll use, though I’m sure the principles are applicable to most other sports:

    In “accruing volume” through “cross-training” or non-running methods the overall aim would be to increase stimulus for cardiac/central adaptions. As I see it, conventional “cardio” training activities like cycling, rowing, skiing etc are easiest to use for this due to the movements being rhythmical and easily sustained for long periods, using large muscle groups and being unlikely to be limited by muscular discomfort or fatigue etc, basically why they are used for energy systems/cardiovascular work in general.

    Overall though, any activity elevating the heart rate to the desired level that can last the appropriate duration should still induce the desired central adaptation, and it may be possible to include drills or exercises which have value in increasing other biomotor abilities e.g. strength/strength endurance, mobility etc. When using exercise like these without appropriately short rests or interspersed with running/cycling etc it can be possible to use this for better efficiency, developing secondary abilities while adding to “aerobic” or “endurance” volume for central adaptation.

    Some sprint coaches like to get their “endurance” or general conditioning work done using these types of general strength and mobility exercises to kill two birds with one stone, and avoid adding potentially injurious or detrimental running volume. I would suggest that endurance athlete’s could take the same attitude, not in replacing standard running work but in supplementing it.

    Basically I see three structures for additional “cross-training” aerobic stimulus:

    1. Just biking or skiing or whatever for a set time.

    2. Biking or other “cardio activity” interpersed with mobility/strength exercises (this kind if structure seems to feature a fair bit on your blog).

    3. Mobility or strength exercises done in quick succession.

    As I mentioned in a previous post, I think the major query is how much this work will detract from other training and how much it will contribute to increased performance. Other than that though I am still unsure how applicable some exercises are to adding extra aerobic volume particularly for endurance athletes with very high aerobic capacity. I would be interested to hear thoughts on what work might be indicated or contraindicated.

    There could also be some argument that these circuits style routines could adequately improve strength/mobility to the point where dedicated work i.e. standard gym work is not necessary, as endurance sports do not require particularly high levels of these qualities. Likewise I would be interested to hear any thoughts on this.

    Here is a real-world example of option 2 from an American athlete named Shalane Flanagan, who won bronze and set a national record in the 10000 metres in Beijing (workout video total 9:53 circuit starts at 3:55):

    http://www.flotrack.org/videos/speaker/83-shalane-flanagan/64864-episode-7-shalane-flanagan

    It basically goes like this:

    1. 7.5 mile tempo (around lactate threshold), a fairly hard though not extreme workout, definitely a “hard” day though.

    2. Circuit. Basically the circuit is 20 second sets of burpees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, squats and hurdle stepovers with a short run in between. So an example of number 2 mainly.

    3. More core drills including med ball throws, pillar/plank work.

    It is interesting that she

    1) Does the circuit work directly after a fairly demanding run (tempo is generally around lactate threshold pace for endurance runners, certainly a “hard” day in the training week).

    2) Uses very much whole body, dynamic movements and saves the static core work and strength work and slower drills for afterwards.

    Strength and mobility type work for distance runners is certainly catching on at the moment, though I think it remains to be seen how it can best be integrated. Alberto Salazar had this to say recently (http://peakrunningperformance.com/webpages/articles/latest-news/training-all-systems-of-your-body_2.html) which I thought was quite logical and interesting, the question still remains though to what extent it will improve performance vs detract from other training, I’d be interested to hear your’s and Lyle’s thoughts on this topic:

    “Musculoskeletal System: Often I have heard and used the analogy that the cardiovascular system can be likened to the engine of a racecar, while the musculoskeletal system is similar to the chassis, suspension, and wheels of the car. As I detailed earlier, we at one time were mainly concerned with the “engine” and paid little attention to the car “body.” Rather than constantly trying to improve the cardiovascular system to handle higher workloads, why not also try to improve the musculoskeletal system so that a given workload, such as race pace intervals, will cost less energy because the musculoskeletal system is strong? Using the car analogy as an example, this can be done by improving the suspension, drive-train, and wheels, as well as ensuring that they are properly maintained and aligned so that the car will be more efficient at a given speed.”

  8. Thought I’d add this as I’m not familiar with Ross Enamait’s stuff though I am sure some on here are, one of Shalane’s training partners Shannon Rowbury (7th in Beijing 1500, ranked 5th in the world for 2008, 4th American al-time so also a eriously elite athlete) says this on his testimonial page:

    Hi Ross,

    I have just begun to scratch the surface of Never Gymless, but I have been very pleased with the results. My teammates and I have incorporated your circuit routines into our regular training, and I feel that it has helped to transform me into a more complete athlete. Most runners just focus on logging miles. I never feel more tired than when I finish one of your Minute Drills, but I have found that the core and upper body strength, as well as explosiveness, that it has helped me to develop has be instrumental at the end of races, allowing me to maintain form and kick rather than break down.

    Thanks for being an important ingredient to my training!

    Go USA!

    Shannon Rowbury
    Nike – Track and Field
    2008 US Olympian

    Obviously this is largely subjective feedback, but it still interesting to see the type of non-convential work being done at the elite level.

  9. It looks like my longer posts don’t get through the system so I’ll post it here in two:

    Thanks Lyle, definitely makes sense, especially the weight-bearing consideration for heavier athletes.

    I wouldn’t mind discussing methods of “accruing volume” more specifically. Basically my thoughts and questions at the moment relate primarily to running so this is the example I’ll use, though I’m sure the principles are applicable to most other sports:

    In “accruing volume” through “cross-training” or non-running methods the overall aim would be to increase stimulus for cardiac/central adaptions. As I see it, conventional “cardio” training activities like cycling, rowing, skiing etc are easiest to use for this due to the movements being rhythmical and easily sustained for long periods, using large muscle groups and being unlikely to be limited by muscular discomfort or fatigue etc, basically why they are used for energy systems/cardiovascular work in general.

    Overall though, any activity elevating the heart rate to the desired level that can last the appropriate duration should still induce the desired central adaptation, and it may be possible to include drills or exercises which have value in increasing other biomotor abilities e.g. strength/strength endurance, mobility etc. When using exercise like these without appropriately short rests or interspersed with running/cycling etc it can be possible to use this for better efficiency, developing secondary abilities while adding to “aerobic” or “endurance” volume for central adaptation.

    Some sprint coaches like to get their “endurance” or general conditioning work done using these types of general strength and mobility exercises to kill two birds with one stone, and avoid adding potentially injurious or detrimental running volume. I would suggest that endurance athlete’s could take the same attitude, not in replacing standard running work but in supplementing it.

    Basically I see three structures for additional “cross-training” aerobic stimulus:

    1. Just biking or skiing or whatever for a set time.

    2. Biking or other “cardio activity” interpersed with mobility/strength exercises (this kind if structure seems to feature a fair bit on your blog).

    3. Mobility or strength exercises done in quick succession.

  10. As I mentioned in a previous post, I think the major query is how much this work will detract from other training and how much it will contribute to increased performance. Other than that though I am still unsure how applicable some exercises are to adding extra aerobic volume particularly for endurance athletes with very high aerobic capacity. I would be interested to hear thoughts on what work might be indicated or contraindicated.

    There could also be some argument that these circuits style routines could adequately improve strength/mobility to the point where dedicated work i.e. standard gym work is not necessary, as endurance sports do not require particularly high levels of these qualities. Likewise I would be interested to hear any thoughts on this.

    Here is a real-world example of option 2 from an American athlete named Shalane Flanagan, who won bronze and set a national record in the 10000 metres in Beijing (workout video total 9:53 circuit starts at 3:55):

    http://www.flotrack.org/videos/speaker/83-shalane-flanagan/64864-episode-7-shalane-flanagan

    It basically goes like this:

    1. 7.5 mile tempo (around lactate threshold), a fairly hard though not extreme workout, definitely a “hard” day though.

    2. Circuit. Basically the circuit is 20 second sets of burpees, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, squats and hurdle stepovers with a short run in between. So an example of number 2 mainly.

    3. More core drills including med ball throws, pillar/plank work.

  11. It is interesting that she

    1) Does the circuit work directly after a fairly demanding run (tempo is generally around lactate threshold pace for endurance runners, certainly a “hard” day in the training week).

    2) Uses very much whole body, dynamic movements and saves the static core work and strength work and slower drills for afterwards.

    Strength and mobility type work for distance runners is certainly catching on at the moment, though I think it remains to be seen how it can best be integrated. Alberto Salazar had this to say recently (http://peakrunningperformance.com/webpages/articles/latest-news/training-all-systems-of-your-body_2.html) which I thought was quite logical and interesting, the question still remains though to what extent it will improve performance vs detract from other training, I’d be interested to hear your’s and Lyle’s thoughts on this topic:

    “Musculoskeletal System: Often I have heard and used the analogy that the cardiovascular system can be likened to the engine of a racecar, while the musculoskeletal system is similar to the chassis, suspension, and wheels of the car. As I detailed earlier, we at one time were mainly concerned with the “engine” and paid little attention to the car “body.” Rather than constantly trying to improve the cardiovascular system to handle higher workloads, why not also try to improve the musculoskeletal system so that a given workload, such as race pace intervals, will cost less energy because the musculoskeletal system is strong? Using the car analogy as an example, this can be done by improving the suspension, drive-train, and wheels, as well as ensuring that they are properly maintained and aligned so that the car will be more efficient at a given speed.”

  12. Tim,

    I suspect that this is the kind of discussion/argument/debate that nobody will ever really ‘win’ because so many different top athletes have achieved the same high results with such different approaches.

    So on the one hand you have Kenyan/ethiopian/East African runners that,for the most part, run, run and run some more. Strength is not emphasize and their general lack of strength ability is mentioned in some sources (cf. Toby Tanser’s books).

    Of course, you can also argue that the amount of running that they do in the hills probably constitutes some strength/reactive work (e.g. Lydiard used 3 weeks of hills to start peaking his guys) so it may already be included in the training. Or they have evolved a lot of elastic potential (known to improve running performance) b/c of the running history of the group. Or whatever.

    There is also the issue that, in general, athletes who are born to do something tend to be able to just do that something without a lot of need to do supplementary stuff. So people often talk about Bulgarian Ol’ers and how they were selected for certain body types and such and that’s probably part of why their uber specific program could be effective. Used on a lesser mortal or someone with a lesser propensity to be built for Olympic lifting, you end up needing a lot more assistance work to bring up weak points: just doing the competition movements don’t get it done.

    You see the same thing in powerlifting, guys built for a given lift may get away with only doing that lift and nothing more. Guys with worse levers need a lot more assistance work to bring up weak points because things won’t strengthen evenly from just doing the lift.

    Basically, the more well built for a given activity someone is, the less they need any sort of supplementary work, they will get everything they need just doing their sport.

    But what about lesser mortals? In that situation, you may need specific supplementary training to bring up weak points or keep the athlete from breaking down. How many runners destroy their joints with endless volume? How many could be saved by replacing some of their volume with supplementary work.

    I always found it interesting that triathletes tended to have less overuse injuries than pure runners/swimmers or cyclists, presumably because the total stress of training was spread across a lot of different muscle groups.

    Of course the key is finding that balance, doing enough work in the sport to improve (you can’t ever get away from specificity) but using supplementary work in an appropriate way to either assist training or prevent injury or what have you. Even that probably depends on the individual athlete and their needs.

    Wow, I wrote a lot of words to say absolutely nothing. I’ve been hanging around Will too much.

    Lyle

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s