How far we’ve come

Barry did a great session today. This is the third time he has done this exact same session. I do this a lot with athletes…it is a marker session…a way of measuring progress and hopefully improvement other than the results that you get from testing. I’m really pleased for Barry for a few reasons mainly because he works for a living like most people…he’s not a professional athlete…he’s got a family and a job and has done what he’s done on the back of 2 or 3 sessions a week in the gym along with the other sessions he’s been able to do on the mat. It is really a matter of optimising your time. What you see here is the difference between pissing around in the gym thinking you know it all…not that I am saying that Barry is like that but lots of athletes are…and having someone who actually knows what they are doing put together a proper program for you…Barry is going to step on the scales at his weigh in without having to starve himself, without having to dehydrate, without having to drain himself in a sauna…on the day of the weigh in he’ll skip breakfast and that’ll be that. I was just looking back at video of his first session…it almost killed him…quite literally. Today on the other hand he just motored for it…it wasn’t even a hard session for him. He was controlled and paced himself throughout.

This is the session:
Bike – 5 minute (Level 5)
Rower – 10×100m with 30 second recovery between efforts.
5 minutes – Lower Body & Upper Body Mobility Work.
Block 1
1A Trap Deadlift (80kg)
1B Pull Ups (BW)
1C Push Ups (BW)
Time=10 minutes complete as many sets as possible.
Set Ratio: 2:1:4
Rower – 10×100m with 45 second recovery between efforts.
Block 2
2A 20kg KB Squats
2B Inverted Rows
2C KB Overhead Press (each arm)
Time=10 minutes complete as many sets as possible.
Set Ratio: 2:1:1
Rower – 10×100m with 60 second recovery between efforts.

Here are the posts relating to the previous 2 sessions that Barry completed previously:
Session 1 – November 26th 2008
Session 2 – January 7th 2009

So here is Barry’s progression:

Here are the totals from the strength blocks from all 3 sessions

Weights Block 1 – November 26th
Total = 22 Trap Bar Deadlifts, 11 Pull Ups and 44 Push Ups.

Weights Block 1 – January 7th
Total = 36 Trap Bar Deadlifts, 18 Pull Ups and 72 Push Ups.

Weights Block 1 – March 10th
Total = 48 Trap Bar Deadlifts, 24 Pull Ups and 96 Push Ups.

Weights Block 2 – November 26th
Total = 40 KB Squats, 20 Inverted Rows, 20 KB Shoulder Presses (each arm)

Weights Block 2 – January 7th
Total = 52 KB Squats, 26 Inverted Rows, 26 KB Shoulder Presses (each arm)

Weights Block 2 – March 10th
Total = 64 KB Squats, 32 Inverted Rows, 32 KB Shoulder Presses (each arm)

Heart Rate Comparison – Weights Blocks
Weights Block1 Session 1 

Weights Block 1 Session 1

Weights Block 1 Session 1

Weights Block 1 Session 3

Weights Block 1 Session 3

Weights Block 1 Session 3

So in the his session today he did an extra 26 more Trap Bar Deadlifts, 13 more Pull Ups and 52 more Push Ups than in his first session of this type and he did so at a lower average heart rate as well as a lower maximum heart rate.

Weights Block 2 Session 1

Weights Block 2 Session 1

Weights Block 2 Session 1

Weights Block 2 Session 3

Weights Block 2 Session 3

Weights Block 2 Session 3

So in the his session today he did an extra 24 more KB Squats, 12 more Inverted Rows and 12 more KB Shoulder presses on each side than in his first session of this type and he did so at a lower average heart rate as well as a lower maximum heart rate.

Rowing Intervals
Session 1 – November 27th
Row 1: 10×100m with 30 second recoveries.
17.1
17.3
17.9
18.5
18.8
18.9
19.0
19.8
19.3
19.5
Time = 3:05.8

Row 2: 10×100m with 45 second recoveries.
18.9
19.2
19.0
19.6
19.3
19.7
19.3
19.6
19.4
18.9
Time = 3:12.8

Row 3: 10×100m with 60 second recoveries.
18.7
18.6
18.2
19.0
19.0
19.1
19.9
19.1
19.0
18.6
Time = 3:09.3

Session 3 – March 10th
Row 1: 10×100m with 30 second recoveries.
18.0
18.1
17.8
18.1
18.2
18.4
18.4
18.5
18.5
18.8
Time = 3:02.8

Row 2: 10×100m with 45 second recoveries.
18.4
18.3
18.1
18.3
18.0
18.8
18.5
18.6
18.6
17.4
Time = 3:03.0

Row 3: 10×100m with 60 second recoveries.
17.9
18.0
17.5
18.0
18.3
17.9
18.5
18.0
17.8
17.4
Time = 2:59.3

Heart Rate Comparison – Intervals
Row 1 Session 1 – Total Time = 3:05.8 & Average Heart Rate = 160bpm

Row 1 Session 1 - 27th November 2008

Row 1 Session 1 - 27th November 2008

Row 1 Session 3 – Total Time = 3:02.8 & Average Heart Rate = 157bpm

Row 1 Session 3 - March 10th

Row 1 Session 3 - March 10th

Row 2 Session 1 – Total Time = 3:12.8 & Average Heart Rate = 160bpm

Row 2 Session 1

Row 2 Session 1

Row 2 Session 3 – Total Time = 3:03.0 & Average Heart Rate = 157bpm

Row 2 Session 3

Row 2 Session 3

Row 3 Session 1 – Total Time = 3:09.3 & Average Heart Rate = 160bpm

Row 3 Session 1

Row 3 Session 1

Row 3 Session 3 – Total Time = 2:59.3 & Average Heart Rate = 157bpm

Row 3 Session 3

Row 3 Session 3

I won’t go into too much detail but suffice to say I am really happy with Barry’s fitness and his massive improvement…the fact that he knocked 10 seconds off his row in the last of his rows and did it at a lower average heart rate and a lower max heart rate is more impressive than it sounds. These are 100 metre intervals think of it as if they were 100m intervals on the track and then have a think about what it would be like to knock 1 second off your best sprint time on each interval. It is a massive improvement especially when you consider the work that he did before in the session…have a look at the difference in the numbers in work blocks 1 and 2 in each of the respective sessions.

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “How far we’ve come

    • …and you know how much it hurts me.

      It is just such a massive improvement. He’ll be testing at the end of next week and I can’t wait to see the results because he’s absolutely going to smash his previous bests.

  1. This is just the most homo thread ever posted. What’s with all the well done Barry shit? Where’s the abuse? I feel strange.

    Thanks everyone. There are a few differences that you can’t get from the results but are probably quite obvious. Firstly, I have no ill effects and feel like I could train right now (I will be training later on). After the November session I felt like shit for the whole day and slept like a baby that night. Secondly, I didn’t nearly puke. The other thing is that all the I-rows on block 2 were to a touch, or as close to a touch as I could get for fear of busting the HRM. The first time probably the first 6 or so were to the touch and after that just as high as I could go.

  2. fair play barry well done. Out of interest how has the increased strength/fitness levels affected your BJJ game apart from keeping you uninjured ?

    • Well the mat time has been the most important thing. I’ve been on the mat for 4 months now uninterrupted save the odd impact injury which keeps me out for a night or two which is my longest time in 3 years. So I suppose it’s hard to attribute any gain to either the additional strength or the additional time in play.

      I was sparring with a guy last Wednesday mind you and he and I hadn’t sparred in probably 6 months and his first reaction after round 1 was to say how much stronger I was since last time. In small things like tighter unders/overs/drags etc. I find my pulling power has gone way up and I can really feel a difference in that.

  3. Fantastic progress Barry!

    I just wanted to ask Barry a couple of questions…

    1) Apart from noticing the strength which you comment on, how have you found your ability to kick and punch while fatigued?

    2) I’m not in the fight game but I thought most fighters were super secret about their training methods so as to not give anything away to opponents. I guess you have no such concerns having your training and progress made so public? It thought that maybe someone might be able to exploit any information they might glean from the stats.

    Onward and upward Barry!

    • 1) Apart from noticing the strength which you comment on, how have you found your ability to kick and punch while fatigued?

      I haven’t noticed anything to be honest because I haven’t been that analytical about my actual sparring or training. For me the primary goal is just to be injury free for the moment. Strength and power gains are a bonus. That being said, I definitely have more power initially. Everyone fatigues over a round so for me having a greater initial power means that I’ll be fatiguing from a higher point. If you catch my drift.

      2) I’m not in the fight game but I thought most fighters were super secret about their training methods so as to not give anything away to opponents. I guess you have no such concerns having your training and progress made so public? It thought that maybe someone might be able to exploit any information they might glean from the stats.

      I don’t really care what people see. The way I see it I’m putting it up to anyone. I’m saying ‘Here’s what I’m doing, so now you have to go do more than me’. Anyway, they couldn’t possibly know what I’m doing by just looking at it. 100kg box squat could mean about 6 different things when it comes to technique, tempo, bar speed. 10 round kicks could mean 10 kicks for speed or ten kicks for quality and so on.

      The only thing anyone can get from what’s on here is that I work hard. and they should know that anyway!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s