I had an athlete tell me once he couldn’t take creatine because it made him too angry

I just read this article this morning…I don’t even know what to say. I thought some of you might find it interesting.

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/bodybuild-risk-for-teen-rugby-stars-1649067.html

Body-build risk for teen rugby stars
New health fears over supplement use to ‘bulk up’ young players

The Irish Rugby Football Union are developing an education programme throughout the underage system in schools, so great are concerns about the use of dangerous supplements like creatine amongst rugby-playing school boys.

Ruth Wood-Martin, the IRFU Performance Nutritionist said: “We actively discourage the use of supplements in underage players and we are developing a programme that will focus on how eating and drinking well is the most effective nutrition strategy to support hard training and quick recovery.”

After routine drug testing was carried out at an under-18 Six Nations Championship match in Cork last year, there are now calls for the anti-doping committee of the Irish Sports Council to investigate under-age sport at a national level.

As rugby schools ‘go to war’ and young players bulk up on sports supplements and performance-enhancing drugs, the fear is that they may be harming themselves in the long term.

A former leading school-rugby star says: “Many players don’t take supplements correctly and some people as young as second and third year had no notion of where products such as no-xplode, armagedin, norateen and creatine came from.

“Some are safe to be using if regulated properly but if taken in large doses they can be harmful. If they hear that people are using it, then that’s usually good enough for them and long-term effects don’t come into it.”

He explained that there is huge pressure within the school rugby system to perform — so the desire is there on the part of students to get an extra edge on muscle mass which a supplement can offer. “The impression is out there that if you have a ‘big’ team you will win and in some cases games masters turn a blind eye. We knew of side effects but everyone thinks ‘that’s not going to happen to me’.”

Protein supplements and creatine are available in health food shops around the country online and some students even set up their own businesses within the school, oblivious to the long-term muscle damage when taken by children under the age of 18.

It was reported on the Off the Ball show on Newstalk last week that an advertisement for supplements was recently removed from a school notice-board. According to a recent article, the vast majority of these mixtures are unregulated and an ongoing study in the US found that 75 per cent of them contained banned substances such as anabolic steroids. Leading personal trainer Marc Smith believes the problem is growing rapidly and evidence is the remarkable difference in size between the school boys of a few years ago compared to those of today.

“Young boys are trying to lump on muscle. They see the internationals and want to be as big as them with weight and protein supplements as the means to an end. It’s one dimensional and they believe these are the ingredients to make them better rugby players but it is destroying them and they will feel the effects in years to come.

“These protein and body building shakes they are bulking up on, no ones knows where they are coming from. Some say the ingredients are thrown into a cement mixer to mix them up.”

Exercise and performance specialist Niall Hobbert asks how many of the schools are hiring in professional or qualified people to train the teams safely and he doesn’t mean qualified rugby coaches but qualified strength and conditioning coaches, sports doctors and sports nutritionists. He said: “Through my experience I see misguided players who are physically imbalanced, nutritionally misguided and injury prone and who are led to believe what they are doing is right because they trust in their coaches and teachers.”

The same young rugby player I spoke to severely damaged his shoulder because of a poor weights programme he was given from his school coach which resulted in him being away from rugby for some time. “A proper weights programme, diet and training combined will make a better player. The sooner the players realise one can’t get all the ingredients that make a great rugby player out of a bottle the better,” he said.

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20 thoughts on “I had an athlete tell me once he couldn’t take creatine because it made him too angry

  1. That is among the most retarded, ill researched and sensationalist articles I’ve ever seen written on supplements.

    I can just imagine these back street supplement labs, cutting the “pure” creatine with flour and talcum powder just to give those junkies a taste so they’ll come crawling back for more.

  2. Leading personal trainer Marc Smith

    “Who??? I did a search:

    Mark has studied with the widely acclaimed Permier Global Organisation where he gained a Dip FTST in Fitness Tranings and Sports Therapy and he is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). Additionally Mark holds qualifications with YMCA as Teacher of Fitness; the Massage Training Institute in Holistic Massage and is also a member of the Register of Nutritional therapists. Mark is a member of the Register of Exercise Professionals where he is an Advanced Instructor Level 3.

    Therefore he has an NVQ in fitness which takes about 3 months and is a “nutritional therapist”- which is an unprotected title- therefore we are all one- if we want to be, can this man be trusted well as he says:

    Marc believes the problem is growing rapidly and evidence is the remarkable difference in size between the school boys of a few years ago compared to those of today.

    “Difference?”

    Young boys are trying to lump on muscle. They see the internationals and want to be as big as them with weight and protein supplements as the means to an end. It’s one dimensional and they believe these are the ingredients to make them better rugby players but it is destroying them and they will feel the effects in years to come.

    “Destroying them oh dear???? In what sense? I have no link with a supplements company but destroying young boys! jesus”

    These protein and body building shakes they are bulking up on, no ones knows where they are coming from. Some say the ingredients are thrown into a cement mixer to mix them up.

    “Some say” “That famous reference used by many a person who has no frame of reference- most of the commercial brands now have to pass IOC testing purely for this reason”

  3. Ian are you questioning the right of journalists to interview whatever halfwit they can find and publish totally unsupported statements and allegations !!!

    I hope not because I have a cement mixer which may have been used to mix cement or protein , im not sure and it doesent really matter as long as you want to lump on muscle. I have three newspapers in a bidding war for full colour shots of said mixer which may or may not have telltale traces of protein , cement and lumps of muscle.

  4. Cement is an excellent way to increase bodyweight. In fact, I’ve seen a 1:1 increase in weight with concrete ingestion: for every pound of concrete you eat, you gain one pound. And since it’s not fat, it must be lean body mass.

  5. In some of the poorer areas of the US, people engage in what I believe is called coprophagia (and I really hope that term doesn’t refer to something very very different); they eat clay. Their diets are so poor in minerals that they eat the clay to get them.

    Little do they know that they are on the bleeding edge of sports nutrition.

    Lyle

  6. Damn, I was afraid of that. coprophia refers to the other thing I was thinking of and it ain’t eating clay. It is still a good way to recycle nitrogen and was probably one of the German secrets of sporting success (a joke that will only make sense if you look up coprophagia).

    The word I wanted was ‘pica’.

    Lyle

  7. You do realize that module 6 of my presentation will be 45′ espousing the benefits of coprophagia, right? 100k Germans can’t be wrong can they?

    Also, urine as a source of melatonin.

  8. yeah I think the bould Allison specialises in a particularly shitty form of journalisim.
    That and the fact that creatine may be the most researched sports supplement on the planet. But im sure Alison wouldnt let a few facts stand in the way of a good story.

  9. It actually makes me wonder if they even research the articles. I never know whether these journalists are ignorant idiots or whether they just do it wilfully knowing that what they’re writing is complete bullshit.

  10. Eric the only problem you’re going to have is cutting the concrete with the creatine. Regular playing cards won’t do so I suggest after the cement mixer, you use a shovel to mix it well.

    After that, we could form it into regular looking concrete blocks and distribute it around the country where rugby players could grind it down and snort it.

  11. This one single post typifies everything there is to know about this blog…it is a cut and paste post and it seems to have garnered far more interest than anything I have ever done myself….seems about right.

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