Speaking of Snipers

Anonymous said…
Will there is a serious image right violation in the use of this footage but we will be willing to overlook this if you can tell us what it all means?

Even if I do tell you…you wouldn’t understand what I said.

How does this test compare to the original ‘Bleep test’ or the ‘150m shuttle’ test?

Those tests are looking at very different things…different physical capacities.

Some players who I would have considered amongst the fittest in the squad seem to have higher rates of fatigue.

You’ve actually had more chance to look through the results than I have from the sounds of it.

Does this directly correlate to less cv capacity.

This test does not measure ‘fitness’ in the sense of cardiovascular endurance…it is a sprint repeatability test…although it is in some way giving us an idea of the effectiveness of the athletes cardiovascular system in replenishing ATP-PC.

This test I’m sure some players will do the test with bodies not fully recovered or at least different rates of recovery from previous individual activity.I presume this could impact on results.

Yes and absolutely.

Then you have those coming back from injury, while personally, I was delighted to get through it, I was waiting for the sniper’s bullet,which i feel affected my willingness to fully extend(best excuse I can come up with).

Probably a better excuse than most I’ve heard from you.

Nonetheless look forward to doing my next one to compare. But a greater understanding of the test will help too. So if you know of coach who can tell me please forward details!!! DF

What I plan to do is to order and rank all the results with regard to the various capacities I’m looking at and I will post it here as well. As I’ve said before I’m am really trying to resist the urge to ‘lecture’ in this blog but to rather just show what is done with regards to strength and conditioning.

I will write a proper explanation though in this case with regards to this particular test.

It’s almost 2.00am and I’ve my first client at 7.00am which means getting up at 6.00am just to psyche myself up and get my head right so I don’t start throwing people off Dun Laoghaire pier when I get down there…and believe me…it tests my self control every morning….so I know that’s a crap explanation but it’ll have to do for now.

Actually…I was waiting for a video to upload so I might as well give you the short version:

Some really basic exercise physiology here…you basically have 3 types of fuels sources for on field or on court exercise…one that allows you to do very little for almost indefinite periods of time. One that allows you to do just a bit for maybe an hour or so and one that allows you to go eyeballs out for a bit under 10 seconds. I’m not going to get into a whole spiel on energy systems…that’s what google is for…suffice to say that you can walk endlessly and jog for a good while but sprinting you can only do for a very short period of time…and your ability to sprint and sprint often is what wins games.

Just about every court or field came involves lots of doing very little or doing just a bit interspersed with a lot of periods of going eyeballs out for very short bursts of time.

My problem is with the way that most coaches/trainers prepare their athletes/players is that they spend way too much time preparing for the doing very little and doing just a bit and not enough time on the going eyeballs out bit.

The fact of the matter is that the thing that really separates the winners from the losers in field and court games is the ability to sprint and sprint repeatedly and to do that you have to be able to recover and replenish those energy stores asap to allow you to do that. When you can’t…you’re body tries to find a way anyhow and that’s why you go ‘lactic’…because your body is trying to find a way to replenish those stores when you can’t. It never ceases to amaze me when coaches, trainers, players say that some athlete isn’t ‘fit’…they then think the answer is to go and do ‘fitness’ work…do some more laps…go for a jog…they know what they are looking at when they see someone that they think is unfit…but they actually have absolutely no understanding of how to fix it or to improve it. Now I could go off on a tangent here because that ‘fitness’ work that they are suggesting will actually help…up to a point but not for the reasons that they think it does…but that’s another story. So back to my point…if I have one…that to be able to sprint repeatedly you need to do two things…refill your energy stores, get rid of any by-products of energy production and or get better at tolerating those by-products…preferably…all of the above.

So what we are seeing with this test is the following:

1. Their speed of 40 metres….as the ads say…Speed Kills…but it also wins games.
2. Their speed repeatability…if you look at Cooper’s scores compared to Farrell’s you’ll see that Coops only ran as slow as Dessie’s fastest sprint of his 10 on his very last effort.

The video just finished uploading so I’ll leave it there…at least till later…there is heaps more to say…and as some of you well know…I’m just the man to say it so I will go into more depth later.

By the way…do more standing trunk/ab work.

I can’t believe I waited till 2.22am for this to upload!

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Speaking of Snipers

  1. Will said . . .

    “the thing that really separates the winners from the losers in field and court games is the ability to sprint and sprint repeatedly.”

    OK, so does this kind of thinking translate easily to fighting? By that I mean, is developing a fighter’s ability to ‘sprint’ and sprint repeatedly, the key ‘conditioning’ factor to consider in training? (by sprint I mean engaging maximal effort at striking and/or defending). Or am I reading too much into what you’re saying?

    cheers

  2. Great post Will, I love this stuff.

    Have you ever done or seen results of similiar tests done before and after atheletes take creatine?

    John

  3. Will said . . .

    “the thing that really separates the winners from the losers in field and court games is the ability to sprint and sprint repeatedly.”

    That’s a brilliant quote…do you mind if I use it?

    OK, so does this kind of thinking translate easily to fighting?

    Absolutely.

    By that I mean, is developing a fighter’s ability to ‘sprint’ and sprint repeatedly, the key ‘conditioning’ factor to consider in training? (by sprint I mean engaging maximal effort at striking and/or defending).

    Absolutely.

    Or am I reading too much into what you’re saying?

    Nope..you are spot on.

    I think most people tend to do their conditioning arse ways around…when it comes to fighting…why train to last the distance when you can train to knock someone out in the first round.

  4. John said…
    Great post Will, I love this stuff.

    I’ve no idea which part you love but I’m glad you like it any way.

    Have you ever done or seen results of similiar tests done before and after atheletes take creatine?

    No…but I’d love to…I know a certain unversity professor that still maintains that creatine has no effect…that’s no effect on anything at all…it is great that someone has that conviction to stupidity…actually I’d prefer someone else to do the study so I can point to it and laugh every time he says it because I’m pretty sure what the results would be…and you all know how I love to remain objective.

    John

  5. I can’t believe that I actually found something useful in your blog as I am going to try the band pulldowns and pullovers today.

    For a fictional strength and conditioning coach, you are not completely without merit.

  6. Michael Sullivan said…

    I can’t believe that I actually found something useful in your blog as I am going to try the band pulldowns and pullovers today.

    I hope you get the band caught around your neck and choke yourself.

    For a fictional strength and conditioning coach, you are not completely without merit.

    Thanks…that means absolutely nothing to me.

    Ian Mellis said…

    As you said speed kills- not true! Extra speed never killed anyone… stopping to quickly did though!

    That’s why you need to work on your posterior chain…no point having a Ferrari engine in the front and Flintstone’s brakes in the back. Just like I’ve never seen a athlete/player that was too fast…I’ve never seen a athlete/player who’s hammers were too strong.

  7. “No…but I’d love to…I know a certain unversity professor that still maintains that creatine has no effect…that’s no effect on anything at all…”

    Yeah right, every time I take creatine my weight goes up my 7lbs (nearly all water) and certain lifts increase dramatically and I can lift more volume at a high intensity with less muscle fatigue. Most notably on lifts like bench pressing and leg extensions, leg curls etc. I don’t get the same return on chins, deadlifts or squats becuase of the extra weight.

    My current best thinking is that from a sports performance perspective the benifits of creatine are marginal given the extra weight you have to haul around for 60, 80 or 90 minutes. I think if your flighting weight is 14 stone you are better off being a true 14 stone rather than 13 and a half plus half a stone of water or 14 and a half stone plus half a stone of water.

    Thats just my current best thinking on this, I’d love to see results of a test like this before and after creatine to improve MY “objectivity” on this one.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s