Can’t believe it is the 1st of July

Had a long day today. So this won’t be a long post…but I want anyone who had a question that they posted that I didn’t answer to post it here in the comments section…or if you have stuff that you want to see…post that as well.

Damian has put a blog together for all the rowing geeks out there.

Just for those that wonder why so many people want to punch my head in during testing.

Just in case you missed it…he got 9.

The Red Dragon did his rowing test tonight:
194, 177, 168, 162, 156, 161 for a 1020 metre total…not bad…not good enough to beat me…but not bad all the same.

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10 thoughts on “Can’t believe it is the 1st of July

  1. hahaha! 9, 9,9. From the fifth rep he didnt have full extension though! Also the grip was a bit short. Good with testing videos, especially since i know now you let your athletes that much slack. My numbers just went up! 🙂
    Okey, new questions (as i continue on the theme “no question is a dumb question”):
    How many athletes do you train in one week?
    What do you usually have to adress first regarding an athlete?
    How long do you let them hang in the pull up bar in testing before you stop the test? (doubt ill get a serious answer on this one:)

  2. You should really get a seat belt for that rower doing that test is dangerous you feel like you are going to fall off all the time and Fanj did 3 times!

  3. Joel Hallström said…
    hahaha! 9, 9,9. From the fifth rep he didnt have full extension though! Also the grip was a bit short. Good with testing videos, especially since i know now you let your athletes that much slack. My numbers just went up! 🙂
    It was his first testing session…I try to ease them in…strict or not though…he’d still get 9, 9, 9.
    Okey, new questions (as i continue on the theme “no question is a dumb question”):
    How many athletes do you train in one week?
    50-70 a day…depends how much I do outside of the facility as well.

    What do you usually have to adress first regarding an athlete?
    Whether they can pay me.

    How long do you let them hang in the pull up bar in testing before you stop the test? (doubt ill get a serious answer on this one:)
    Until I can’t hold the laughter in any longer.

  4. Ok, so for back stability I’d imagine you use rdl’s and bridges, but what do you do for knee stability?

  5. Okey, sweet. Quick answers as usual!
    50-70 a day! Thats crazy. I have another question id like to send by mail, but im pretty skeptic about you replying…My question is, will you read in and respond to it if i mail it to you? Pretty please? Its not particullary long)

  6. Jonathan said…
    Ok, so for back stability I’d imagine you use rdl’s and bridges, but what do you do for knee stability?
    Absolutely..that’s a given.

  7. Joel Hallström said…
    Okey, sweet. Quick answers as usual!
    50-70 a day! Thats crazy. I have another question id like to send by mail, but im pretty skeptic about you replying…My question is, will you read in and respond to it if i mail it to you? Pretty please? Its not particullary long)
    Absolutely.

  8. Juat reposting a question. . .

    I just got back from training Muay Thai in Thailand. If you don’t know, muay thai is like kickboxing, but you can grapple standing up and also use knees and elbows to strike.

    A fight is 3min x 5 rounds with 2min rest in between each rounds.

    The average fighter in Thailand would fight once or twice a month.

    Okay, so my question concerns training (particularly frequency & duration).

    A standard training routine for a thai fighter is . . .

    two 3-4 hour sessions a day (morning/late afternoon), 6 days a week.

    a typical session would be . . .

    5-10km run
    skipping (1/2 hour)
    warm up dynamic/passive stretching (1/2 hour)
    bag work (1/2 hour)
    pad work (1/2 hour)
    sparring or grappling (1/2 hour)
    bodywight exercises (1/2 hour)
    cooldown (1/2 hour)

    Whilst I had a good time over there, I thought their training wasn’t really ideal for the event they’re training for. That being said, ALL the champion fighters have and do train this way.

    What are your thoughts on how they do things? Are they training right? Are they succeeding in their sport IN SPITE of their training?

    If you were coaching a thai fighter, what would be the basic strategies you would use?

    I just realized I’ve asked a shit-tonne of questions. Sorry about that . . . any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

    thanks

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